Safeguarding nurse named Queen’s Nurse

A community nurse from Kirklees has been awarded the prestigious title of Queen’s Nurse by community nursing charity The Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI) in recognition of her commitment to high standards of practice and patient-centred care, leadership and learning.

Christina Fairhead, Designated Nurse Safeguarding Children for Greater Huddersfield CCG and North Kirklees CCG has worked in the nursing profession for 41 years, with 29 years spent in community services.

Her community roles have included Practice Nurse, School Nurse, Health Visitor and Sure Start Health Manager. Over the last 14 years Christina has worked in various NHS child safeguarding roles in Leeds and Kirklees.

Christina said: “I love working in the community and in particular children’s services. I have always worked in areas of challenge. Safeguarding children is much more than child protection. It’s about helping to ensure children become the best they can be and, through leadership and guidance, promoting the health and welfare of children in all commissioning decisions.”

The Queen’s Nurse title is given to a limited number of registered nurses working in primary or community care each year. The title demonstrates the nurses’ commitment to quality care, advocacy for patients, families and carers, and to learning and development.  Recipients benefit from joining a network of nurses with access to sharing best practice and opportunities to influence policy.

 

woman holding certificate and badge

Christina Fairhead, Queen’s Nurse

 

Christina was presented with the honour at a special ceremony in London last week.

Christina said: “It’s a real privilege to be called a Queen’s Nurse. I feel incredibly proud to join a network of nurses of such high calibre. It’s something I never expected, and I am committed to sharing the benefits with colleagues so that we can continue to support children and their families to be the best they can be.”

Penny Woodhead, Chief Quality and Nursing Officer for the CCGs said: “Christina is an inspiration. She is passionate about ensuring children are at the centre of decisions and continually provides expert guidance and leadership in relation to safeguarding children.

“The process to become a Queen’s Nurse is quite challenging and we’re extremely proud that Christina has been selected.”

Dr Crystal Oldman CBE, Chief Executive of the QNI added: “On behalf of the QNI I would like to congratulate Christina and welcome her as a Queen’s Nurse. Queen’s Nurses serve as leaders and role models in community nursing, delivering high quality health care across the country. The application and assessment process to become a Queen’s Nurse is rigorous and requires clear commitment to improving care for patients, their families and carers. We look forward to working with Christina and all other new Queen’s Nurses who have received the title this year.”

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